Last edited by Sagrel
Monday, October 12, 2020 | History

3 edition of socio-economic explanation of high fertility found in the catalog.

socio-economic explanation of high fertility

John Charles Caldwell

socio-economic explanation of high fertility

papers on the Yoruba Society of Nigeria

by John Charles Caldwell

  • 329 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Demography, Australian National University in Canberra .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Nigeria.
    • Subjects:
    • Yoruba (African people) -- Economic conditions.,
    • Yoruba (African people) -- Social conditions.,
    • Fertility, Human -- Nigeria.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references.

      Statement[by] John C. Caldwell.
      SeriesChanging African family project series ;, monograph no. 1
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDT513 .C17
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvii, 133 p. ;
      Number of Pages133
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4602751M
      ISBN 100708101437
      LC Control Number77365812

      Abstract: This paper presents the findings of some recent research on the social and the economic benefits of female education and considers the pathways through which women's schooling leads to social gains. These findings may provide insights as to why Bahá'u'lláh stressed the importance of women's education. Introduction In the Bahá'í teachings there are . Asia-Pacific Population Journal, September 3 countries in South Asia with high fertility. However, recent evidence suggests the beginning of a fertility decline. The total fertility rate of the the positive socio-economic changes occurring in Maldives, such as the.

        This study investigates the role of changing social relations for fertility decline during the European fertility transition. The growth of voluntary associations at the end of the nineteenth century entailed a radical shift in the landscape of social relations in Sweden. By combining micro-census data from to with local-level membership data for three Cited by: 2. The demographic transition describes changes over the course of socio-economic modernization. What happens at a very high level of development is not a question we can answer with certainty since only few societies have reached this stage. But we do have some good evidence that at very high levels of development fertility is rising again.

        The book was not called The Handmaid's Tale at first – it was called Offred – but I note in my journal that its name changed on 3 January , when almost pages had been written. That's. Fertility is the natural capability to produce offspring. As a measure, fertility rate is the number of offspring born per mating pair, individual or population. Fertility differs from fecundity, which is defined as the potential for reproduction (influenced by gamete production, fertilization and carrying a pregnancy to term) [citation needed].A lack of fertility is infertility while a lack.


Share this book
You might also like
Breaking free

Breaking free

Rainbows

Rainbows

Social learning and clinical psychology.

Social learning and clinical psychology.

Proceedings of the First CCF Users Meeting

Proceedings of the First CCF Users Meeting

A Minisink fragment

A Minisink fragment

Hyperbaric oxygenation: proceedings of the Second International Congress, Glasgow, September 1964.

Hyperbaric oxygenation: proceedings of the Second International Congress, Glasgow, September 1964.

second Mrs. Clay

second Mrs. Clay

RUENTEX INDUSTRIES

RUENTEX INDUSTRIES

Shield & Meyer

Shield & Meyer

Basics of electric motors

Basics of electric motors

The flowers of literature

The flowers of literature

Latin elegiac verse

Latin elegiac verse

Socio-economic explanation of high fertility by John Charles Caldwell Download PDF EPUB FB2

Socio-economic explanation of high fertility. Canberra: Dept. of Demography, Australian National University, (OCoLC) Online version: Caldwell, John C. (John Charles). Socio-economic explanation of high fertility.

Canberra: Dept. of Demography, Australian National University, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book. Book Description: This volume summarizes the major findings of the Princeton European Fertility Project. The Project, begun inwas a response to the realization that one of the great social revolutions of the last century, socio-economic explanation of high fertility book remarkable decline in.

Unfortunately, this book can't be printed from the OpenBook. If you need to print pages from this book, we recommend downloading it as a PDF. Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF. Coal and Hoover () in their book “Population growth and development in low income countries” stated that the pace of economic development depends on the diversion of resources from consumption to uses that raise future output.

A population with a high ratio of dependents on producers consumes more of aFile Size: KB. In Barnes and Guinnane published a revised statistical analysis of the critical evaluation of the official social class model of fertility decline that was presented in chapter 6 of Author: Simon Szreter.

An Explanation of FluctuationS in American Fertility: The Work of Easterlin Like Leibenstein's ideas, the main focus of Easterlin's work has been on fertility variations over : Warren Sanderson. The demographic transition is the change in the human condition from high mortality and high fertility to low mortality and low fertility.

This book addresses the situation among hunters and gatherers, traditional farmers and classical civilizations, and examines the modern transition The socio-economic explanation of high fertility.

Cultural Factors and Fertility Transition. In addition to these socioeconomic factors, there were a number of cultural factors unique to sub-Saharan Africa that promoted or facilitated ongoing high fertility (cf Lesthaeghe, ; Romaniuk, ).

Probably the most important in this regard was the emphasis on the extended family and the lineage. Author(s): Caldwell,J C Title(s): The socio-economic explanation of high fertility: papers on the Yoruba Society of Nigeria/ J.C. Caldwell. Country of Publication: Australia Publisher: Canberra, Australian National University, Description: p.

Author(s): Caldwell,J C Title(s): Fertility and the household economy in Nigeria/ J.C. Caldwell. In: Socio-economic explanation of high fertility: Papers on the Yoruba Society of Nigeria, edited by J.C.

Caldwell Country of Publication: Australia Publisher: Canberra, Australia, Australian National Univ., Dept. of Demography, demographic, socio-economic and cultural factors These scholars focused on the fertility upturn in Europe, thus whether the explanation of fertility upturn is applicable to family norms contributed to high fertility rates in the past (Castiglioni File Size: KB.

The effect of social security on fertility is the most complex factor to study, because: (1) it is difficult to assess the motivations of individuals, (2) the time lags between fertility decisions and old-age are very long, (3) it is the community’s social security system that is believed to affect individual fertility, and (4) aggregate Cited by: 2.

In high‐fertility countries, those in the early stages of the transition, desired fertility may exceed actual fertility, so that broader socio‐economic changes that affect desired fertility have little impact on observed fertility.

31 Interestingly, they also find that effects of social learning about the fertility calculus of others, and Cited by: 6. Teenage pregnancy rates in the US have declined dramatically – 40 percent in two decades – but remain among the highest in the developed world.

A new study suggests American teens don't have Author: Stephanie Hanes. the high fertility of these earlier decades.7 In fact, economists are unsure if the relationship between population and GDP growth that existed in the s is continuing into the s or will continue into the 21st century.

8File Size: KB. Research on Humanities and Social Sciences N (Paper) ISSN (Online)Vol.3, No.3, Socio-economic and Demographic Determinants of Unmet Need for Family Planning in India and its Consequences Subhash BarmanPopulation Studies Unit, Indian Statistical Institute,B.

Road, KolkataWest Bengal, India E-mail:. In this book, Jonas Wood offers a comprehensive analysis of socio-economic differentiation in reproductive behaviour. Extensive geographical coverage also enables him to take into account differences in economic context and social policy across European : Angela Greulich.

The book documents the progress of the fertility decline and displays its association with social and economic characteristics. It addresses an explanation of the phenomenal fall of fertility in this Islamic context by considering the relevance of standard theories of fertility transition.

My first book on this subject was Dysgenics (), which described the deterioration of genetic intelligence in many economically developed nations caused by the lower fertility of those with high IQs, especially women.

It sets out the evidence that modern populations have been deteriorating genetically from around in terms of health. Keeping Pakistan’s high fertility in check. Murtaza Haider demographic and socio-economic factors reported strong correlation with the fertility outcomes.

A very long explanation for. Replacement fertility is the total fertility rate at which women give birth to enough babies to sustain population levels. According to the UN Population Division, a total fertility rate (TFR) of about children per woman is called replacement-level fertility. If replacement level fertility is sustained over a sufficiently long period, each generation will exactly replace itself.Another theory on populations is known as the demographic transition which says that birth and mortality rates are linked, so that for example, a high rate of both leads to stable population growth, while an imbalance of high birth rates compared to mortality rates would lead to accelerated growth.

Socio-economic and cultural factors add to the issue, aspects shared also by most of Western Europe. "There are two reasons fertility rates can decline," said J. David Hacker, a SUNY Binghamton Author: Stefan Anitei.